Main town features a neoclassical harbour of pastel-coloured buildings. Beyond the town, you’ll find coastal hikes, coves ideal for swimming and historic sights, from the elegant Panormitis monastery to castle ruins.

The entrance of the horseshoe-shaped port is dominated by Roloi, a clock tower. Right in front of it there is the statue of the fisher boy, Michalaki (little Michael), which seems to be welcoming the visitors to the island. The Town Hall, the cathedral, the square and the Naval Museum of Symi are the main attractions on this side. The latter lends an insight to the naval tradition of the island and boasts, amongst other things, exhibits representing the evolution of sponge fishing through the years. 

At the location Myloi, visit Pontikokastro (the castle of mice!); there is a prehistoric tomb as well as remnants of old mills, used in the past for crushing grains into flour, yet some of them are households today. Behind the highest mountain of the island (560m) lies a beautiful cypress and pine tree forest.
The forest at Kourkouniotis is home to 120 byzantine wine presses of which eleven have been restored. The island held a fine tradition in winemaking up to the 18th c.
The most significant event is Symi’s Festival that hosts a large number of cultural events such as classical and modern music concerts, dance, theater, cinema, and literature evenings from July to September every year.

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